Kim’s 10 Minutes or Less

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Hi everybody! Kim here from My Kraft Kloset sharing an idea for making cards in 10 minutes or less. Yes, it can be done and not look like kindergarteners made them—really! I don’t know about you, but I absolutely LOVE 6×6 patterned paper pads and I have a huge collection of them. So, I will show you how to make 24 cards from a simple template, one 6×6 paper pad and a few embellishments! Yes, I’m going to make you cut up those pretty pads you’ve been saving.

Anchored Bundle Paper Pad
As I sit here snowed in with two feet of snow outside, it’s a perfect day to get crafting! The hardest part of this project is choosing which paper pad to use. I chose this wonderfully detailed nautical paper pad and created all-occasion cards as you can never have too many of those.

Cut a 12 x 12-inch sheet of cardstock in half creating two 6 x 12-inch pieces. Fold each piece in half to create two 6 x 6-inch card bases. Select desired patterned paper and cut following the six examples on the template. Note: Click here to view template. Place the cut pieces in six separate piles to coordinate with cards 1 through 6. I recommend making six cards at a time so you don’t get your pieces mixed up. Also, if your patterned paper is double-sided, flip it over for even more variations.

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Using the template as a guide, adhere the paper pieces to the card bases as shown. Add ribbon or twine, sticker sentiments, and a few rhinestones to complete. With this handy template provided by My Kraft Kloset, it really does take 10 minutes or less to cut all the paper pieces and adhere to card bases. Now to make 18 more in an hour or less—you can do it. The combinations are endless. Leave a comment and let us know what you think of this project..

Thanks for stopping by the blog today!

Kim

Supplies used: Red cardstock from Stampin’ Up!; 6×6 Anchored Bundle paper pad from Authentique; Remarks Thoughtful Phrase stickers, Primio Adhesive polka-dot ribbon and baker’s twine from American Crafts; Recollections 2-inch circle punch and adhesive rhinestones and pearls from Michaels Stores; Notebook Border Punch from EK Success; 12 x 12-inch paper trimmer from Fiskars; 1.5-inch sticker maker from Xyron; Marathon Adhesive Runner from Bazzill Basics Paper.

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Pamela’s Technique of the Week: Window Cards

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Hello everyone! Pamela here today to share one of my favorite card-making techniques—window cards! They are much easier to create than they appear, but I think we should keep that part just among ourselves here. One tip before I begin sharing the step-by-steps of my sample card is that I highly recommend using a heavy-weight cardstock for your card base. This is especially helpful for stability if your window is large like mine.

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1. Form a 5 x 7-inch card from heavy-weight white cardstock. Round corners if desired.

2. Cut a 4 3/4 x 6 3/4-inch panel from red cardstock. Score three lines 1/4 inch apart near bottom as shown. Round corners if desired; adhere panel to card front.

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3. Die-cut a heart through card front. Set hearts aside.

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4. Die-cut a heart frame from white cardstock by using two heart dies together. To create this frame, I nested a solid-edge heart die inside a scallop-edge heart die, secured them together with tape and ran them through the die-cutting machine.

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5. Die-cut a star from white cardstock. Clip away star to use in another project. Tip: If you don’t have this specific die, there are many frilly-vine dies that would work well. Adhere tail to heart frame as shown below. Adhere pearls as shown. Use small pieces of foam tape to adhere frame to card front.

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6. Using the hearts set aside from step 3, heat-emboss sentiment onto white heart with red ink. Offset red heart slightly behind white heart as shown. Tip: My elegant-style card calls for a heat-embossed sentiment. If your card is not so fancy, you could stamp your sentiment with dye ink or chalk.

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7. Before adhering stamped heart in place, align it with window as desired. Sign back of card and you’re done! Tip: After a few people asked me to sign the back of my card before they framed them, I started signing all my cards. It’s pretty awesome when people frame your cards.

Bonus Card

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I have a bonus card for you! Window cards come together quickly if you use punches like I have here on this bonus card. Plus, it’s a one-layer card which is a rarity for me.

I used a 1 1/4-inch-square punch to make three windows on a 5 1/2 x 4 1/4-inch card. I punched a strip of lattice trim and adhered it behind the windows. Tip: You could also use vellum or another lacy paper instead of trim. Or, you could make frames if you have two sizes of punches. You’ll notice I used the frilly tail again from the star die. It was silver this time. I love that tail! I finished up by heat-embossing the sentiment with pink ink.

I’ve enjoyed sharing my cards with you today. I would love to see the window cards you create and hear any tips you might have for this fun technique.

I can hardly wait to show what I have up my sleeve for my next post. It will give a whole new life to many of your punches and stamps. It is something I learned years ago in my college art class.

Pamela

Supplies used: The Paper Studio heavy-weight white, red and pink cardstock from Hobby Lobby; silver foil from DCWV; I Blank You stamp set from Paper Smooches; Butterfly Endearment stamp set from Unity Stamp Company; pink ink pad from Clearsnap Inc.; clear super-fine detail embossing powder from Ranger Industries Inc.; pearls from Michaels Stores; 1 1/4-inch-square punch, Lattice Chain punch and Martha Stewart scoring board from EK Success; Ornate Hearts dies (#CSBD53) from Our Daily Bread Designs; Shining Star die (#S2-181) from Spellbinders® Paper Arts.

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Card Challenge Corner: Love Is in the Air

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Valentine "Flamingle"

Design by Sue Custer; find complete instructions in our spring issue available here!

Remind a special someone how much they are loved by creating a valentine just for them this week! If you need ideas, check out our spring issue on newsstands now. And remember to share a photo or two with us of the valentines you make!

Editor’s Note: Remember to post photos of your designs on the CardMaker Facebook page!

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Carisa’s U Inspire Me

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Hi everyone! Carisa here from Inky Fairy Designs back with another post for you! First I want to say thank you ALL so much for the incredible comments on my first post—you guys are absolutely why I LOVE this hobby so much!!

For today’s post, I was asked to use a photo for inspiration; it could be from anywhere like a magazine, art, etc. I headed to Pinterest! I searched general categories like art, fashion and even popular to get a completely random group of pins. I saw the image below and immediately knew I had found my inspiration.

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Photo from here via Pinterest

Pretty, right?! As soon as I saw it, I remembered a die I had in my stash that was the perfect pattern and I knew I wanted to use my watercolors to create the background. It was instant how I had my idea and I couldn’t wait to get started.

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I started by picking three Daniel Smith Extra Fine Watercolors: moonglow, duochrome aquamarine and rhodonite genuine. I love using watercolors to create backgrounds because of the loose and organic look I get every single time. Daniel Smith Watercolors are one of my favorites right now—they are some of the most unique watercolors I’ve used and I’m in love with them.

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Here is a close-up of what I’m talking about—pretty! I can’t even … every single time I use these watercolors, I get giddy like a kid in a candy store! I kept the rest of my card design simple because I really wanted the watercolor background to be the focal point. I used gold glitter paper with the die and it’s adhesive-backed so it made working with this intricate die super easy. I embossed my sentiment on vellum and added a few sequins for a final touch and that was it! I filmed my process for you so you can see the watercolors in action and how the entire card comes together. I hope you enjoy the video!

What about you? Where do you look for inspiration in your card making? Do you hop on Pinterest like I did or do you find it somewhere else? I’d love to hear about your favorite places to find inspiration in the comments below! Seriously … I have another photo inspired challenge in a few months and need some ideas. 😉

Carisa

Supplies used: Recollections white cardstock from Michaels Stores; Artistico Extra White 140lb Hot Press Watercolor Paper from Fabriano; gold glitter adhesive-backed sheets from My Favorite Things; Acts of Kindness stamp set from Hero Arts; black dye ink pad from WPlus9 Design; VersaMark watermark ink pad from IMAGINE Crafts/Tsukineko; ultra fine embossing powder from Simon Says Stamp; Extra Fine Watercolors from Daniel Smith Inc.; sequins from Pretty Pink Posh; jute twine from May Arts Ribbon; Black Velvet Round 8 watercolor brush from Silver Brush Limited; Cover Plate: Quatrefoil die (#PTD-0205) from Papertrey InkBig Shot die-cutting machine from Sizzix; double-sided foam adhesive from 3M; Zots Bling from Therm O Web.

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Kim’s Storage Tip

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Photo from Craftsman

Hi everybody! Kim here to share a storage tip. My favorite storage item is my tote bag filled with basic supplies for card making or scrapbooking. It goes everywhere with me when I’m crafting. There are many styles and brands out there, but I love this tote my hubby got me a few Christmases ago from the hardware store of all places. It’s not your ordinary tote. It’s tough, but lightweight, open and sturdy. It comes in many colors, has lots of pockets and space, and costs a lot less than some craft brands.

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Once you have selected your tote, it’s time to fill it. Choose the tools and products you grab for and use the most. As you can see, mine has many types of scissors, pens, multiple ink pads, embossing powders, various adhesives, a small sticker maker and usually a paper trimmer, too.  I have placed smaller tools in the pockets like a paper piercer, bone folder, paper distress tool, H2O pen and a watermark pen.

When your tote is filled, you’re ready to start crafting, or pick up and go to a crop, or head off to a weekend retreat with your girlfriends. No more shuffling and searching—you’ll be more organized, and have your basic tools right at your fingertips. So, look around you for storage inspiration and get organized. Where do you find unique storage? Leave a comment and let us know. We’d love to hear from you.

Thanks for stopping by today!

Kim

Supplies: Tool tote from Craftsman.

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Dawn’s CardMaker Tip

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Hi, Dawn here with a stamping tip this week to get perfect images and straight verses every time! My tip will also make those ho-hum colored images POP! If you’ve been on the fence about whether or not you should invest in a MISTI, I hope this tutorial will help you decide. I love mine and use it every time for my cling and clear stamps! Lol—I get no kickback from the company; I just love the product!

There are lots of videos on YouTube on how to use one, so I won’t go into that. I’ll just show you how you can go from this …

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to this!

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I like to use Memento tuxedo black ink for my first stamping. This first step doesn’t need to be perfect, just enough to see where color is needed, so no worries if the image is light. Note: It’s important to not move your stamped image at this point! I color directly on my MISTI. This assures that my next stamping step will be spot on.

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This looks fine and could be used as is, but get ready for the POP part! Note: Some mediums such as colored pencils and watercolors may dull the ink a bit when coloring over it unless the image has been embossed.

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I like to add some accents with acrylic paint or, as in this instance, white gel pen. You can see where some of the white pen ink has covered the stamped image … not to worry!

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Since I’ve colored on the MISTI and my stamp is still in the same place, I can easily “over-stamp” the colored image knowing the lines will be in the right spots. I like to use Archival jet black ink at this point as it’s a strong black color.

Now you can go ahead and finish your card however you want. You don’t even have to worry if your verse will be straight or not! The grid lines help you line up the words. Note: Always stamp verse on a test paper first just to be safe.

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Crooked

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Straight

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You can even highlight special words if you want by stamping your verse in a light color. You can also just ink up the “word” that you want highlighted and wipe the excess ink away, but since I was going to be using black ink for the rest of the verse I didn’t bother. Again, leave your stamp and paper in the same position. 

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Next, make a mask of the word/s you want to highlight by stamping on a sticky note and carefully cutting around the word. Once again, since your stamp is still in the same position, you can “over-stamp” with black ink.

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One more tip: Color the edge of your mat with one of the colors used in your image to match!

Have FUN!

Dawn

Supplies used: Pastel Paper Pack (releasing Feb. 1, 2016), Fragrance stamp set, Double Stitched Circles dies (#CBD136), Circles dies (#CBD142) and Doily dies (#CSBD62) from Our Daily Bread Designs; Archival jet black ink pad from Ranger Industries Inc.; Memento tuxedo black ink pad from IMAGINE Crafts/Tsukineko; Chalk wisteria ink pad from Clearsnap; Copic® markers from Imagination International Inc.; white gel pen from Sakura of America Inc.; ribbon from May Arts Ribbon; MISTI stamp positioning tool from My Sweet Petunia.

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Card Challenge Corner: Husking Challenge

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Gift-Card Holder
Husking is a quilling technique where instead of forming coils, you wrap the paper strips around pins to create shapes. Designer Heidi Bishop designed a stunning gift-card holder for our spring issue that features this unique technique. Try your hand at husking this week and share a photo with us; we’d love to see how you do!

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Christine Okken Guest Post: Colorplay With Words

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Hello friends! I’m Christine and today I’m delighted to guest with CardMaker and show off a few fun ways to use color in your designs in combination with words.

Word dies are still all the rage in card making and I love the effect they can give to create a great statement. How about looking at those words in a new way that also showcases color? Color and coloring are some of my favorite ways to create.

We’re going to play with a technique called Pointillism. I love this style! It was made famous by an artist named Seurat in the late 1800’s and is such an effective technique. It takes some time but it’s very relaxing too, always an added bonus!

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I started this design by using a word die and cutting it in the bottom quarter of a 4 x 5 1/4-inch piece of white cardstock. I like using the negative image of the die cut because you have a whole lot of room to work to create the effect. Save the tiny inner pieces of the letters from the die and set them aside.

Then choose an array of colors of alcohol markers. For this style it works best if the markers are in the same color family. I like Copic® markers because of their narrow point.

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I started with my lightest shade of pink (R81) and added dots around the word cutout by lightly pressing my marker straight down onto the paper. I usually do my dots in a triangle formation around the page (three at a time in a triangle grouping) and I usually vary the size of my dots, some quite small with really light pressure, and then some a little larger where I leave my marker on the page a bit longer so the color soaks in. In the picture above, I’ve used both R81 and R83 markers. I use the lightest color the farthest out on the page and then add in the deeper color onto the page “less deep,” so the deeper areas of color are building toward the word.

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Here you can see how I’ve added the R85 and R89 colors concentrating the deeper color toward the word and the lighter colors further out. It almost gives you a bokeh effect of photography.

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Here is the finished design. I’ve added foam dots behind the front image to pop it away from the main card. I’ve also colored in the tiny spots where there were little pieces of the letter die that were set aside earlier and added them carefully when the popped-up layer was already attached.

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An embossed vellum sentiment and a strip of sticky tape covered in glitter complete the design. With all of the fun dotty color it really makes a great statement.

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You can also accomplish this style using one single color like black. I used the same process for this design using only black markers and multiliners on kraft cardstock. My husband really liked this design and told me how sharp it was. The black metallic paper behind the word cutout is really jazzy too, and I think really adds to the effect.

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A little satin ribbon and a popped-up heart die cut complete it.

Now how about stepping into the 1970’s with a little vibrant color for the next design?

I vividly remember being in grade three and my teacher passing us a piece of 8 1/2 x 11-inch white paper asking us to boldly write our name in the center of the page in black marker. Then, using wax crayons we made little up and down strokes with our crayons to surround each letter row by row. Each row was a different color and we needed to fill the whole page with color. Anyone else do that too? I thought it would be fun to experiment and see if we could do that with Copic® markers.

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For this design I wanted to pick a word that was meaningful to me and also reflected the look we were going for. Vibrant is a word I’ve picked for my year, wanting to live a life that’s vibrant in all areas. Of course, I haven’t found a die for that. :) So, I used my Silhouette Cameo machine and typed out the word “vibrant’ in a size I wanted to fit on a 4 x 5 1/4-inch piece of cardstock. I also cut two extra “vibrant” words and set them aside to be used later.

I colored up my word with a deep teal marker in a solid fashion and then set the letters aside, again using the negative image. With little flicking strokes, I colored all around the word in one row with one marker color. Then as you can see below, I added other colors as I went around the page. Make sure you have a sheet of scratch paper beneath your design before you start coloring.

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You could do this in any pattern of colors. I chose to use complementary colors in blues and greens because I love them so much, but you could do a design with all the colors in the rainbow in a pattern as well. It really gives you that vivid 1970’s tie-die sort of feel.

Once I was completed coloring the rows I took the word and glued the extra layers to each letter to form a thicker stack of three. Then, when it was on the card base I could fit my letters into the puzzle and complete the design.

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Here’s the vibrant end result! I stamped a sentiment and added a few embellishments.

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Here you can see the thickness of the letters and how they look stacked in the cutout areas.

I hope this inspires you to try and play a little with color and words maybe even trying a new technique for fun! Thanks for joining me today—it was fun to be with you!

Christine

Supplies used: White cardstock from Neenah Paper Inc.; Words of Love and Commemorating You stamp sets and Nested Hearts and Always dies from The Cat’s Pajamas; Copic® markers (BG05, BG09, BG18, BG32, BG34, R81, R83, R85, R89, YG07, YG09, YG21, YG25) from Imagination International Inc.; electronic cutting machine from Silhouette America Inc.

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Creative Space: Linda Beeson

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Linda here to share a little bit of my creating space. Raising four kids and having them move out one by one gave me the great opportunity to have my own room for creating and storing my craft supplies.

Instead of showing you an overall photo, I wanted to highlight some of my favorite things in the room and the way I store items. One thing I have learned is that storage is key on allowing you to use your supplies. Over time I have learned what items I want closest to my crafting space. Every once in awhile, I analyze how convenient my work space is.

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I love photography as well as card making and scrapbooking, so it was important to me to be able to showcase some of my favorite photos of my kids and grandkids. I found this framed magnet board and created a collage look allowing me to easily add or subtract photos. I found the adorable heart garland at Michaels and since I love red and hearts it seemed like a great accent.

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It’s important to me to have my cardstock and patterned papers close by while I’m creating. I have found these upright storage bins to be my favorite way to store my papers. After trying several systems, this is the most convenient and fast way for me to chose what I want for each project.

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I love punches. I have loved them for a long time and I have many. Whenever I purge my supplies, my punches are one of those things I can’t get rid of. I have a few of these towers of plastic drawers in my room and they are the perfect way for me to store them.

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My first introduction to paper crafts was with stamping. Back then, wood-mounted stamps were available so I have a particular love for them. I do love newer clear, cling styles of stamps because they tend to be more economical and come in little sets. However, I love to see my wood-mounted ones and these little wood shelves put them on display. This makes it easy to pick out which ones I want to use, too.

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Last but not least on my little peek are these mini Distress ink pads. I love these and I want them within reach so I bought a little dish that is just right for holding them within reach. I have many other stamp pads and most of them are in plastic drawer towers within my reach. Another fun thing I have found are super cute mugs that hold various supplies. I’m all about the “cute” factor and the mugs also help keep me organized with pens and brushes, etc.

Thanks for letting me share part of my love of crafting and creating.

Linda

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Dawn’s Technique of the Week: Adding the Finishing Touch!

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Hi! Dawn here with my first blog team post of the year which is a little tutorial on lining your envelopes. Taking a little extra time to line your envelope to match your card can make all the difference in the world! Lining can be anything from a pretty magazine page, flyer page, background stamp or designer paper. The sky is the limit!

Here are my easy steps to line any envelope.

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Trace your envelope, whether it be a squared-off or a pointed one, onto cardstock that you’ll use as a template.

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Use scissors or a paper cutter to cut the template, cutting inside the line approximately 1/16th of an inch. You will also need to cut approximately 1/2 inch from the bottom edge. This will allow for your lining to slide down into your envelope just under the glued sealing edge at the top.

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Use your template to trace onto your lining material and cut.

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Slide your lining into your envelope making sure it fits nicely and is below the top edge. Make any adjustments.

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To make the liner fold easier, use a scoring board and tool to score along the fold line of the envelope.

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Apply a little adhesive along the top edge of the lining to hold it in place.

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Add an envelope liner to your card today and kick it up a notch!

Dawn

Supplies used: Shabby Rose Collection 6×6 Paper PadWishing Words, Safe Travels, Boho Paisley BackgroundButterfly and Bugs and Trois Jolies Papillons stamps and Wishing (#CBD139), Butterfly and Bugs (#CSBD76), Trois Papillons (#CSBD92), Boho Background (#CSBD107), Circles (#CBD142), Double Stitched Circles (#CBD136), Double Stitched Rectangles (#CBD123), Ornate Hearts (#CSBD53) and Doily (#CSBD62) dies from Our Daily Bread Designs; Archival jet black ink pad from Ranger Industries Inc.; Memento gray flannel ink pad from IMAGINE Crafts/Tsukineko; Copic® markers from Imagination International Inc.; Snow Marker from Marvy Uchida; ribbon from May Arts Ribbon; Wire Fence embossing folder from Darice Inc.; Swiss Dots embossing folder from Cricut.

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